Nickernews.net - Where Barn Banter Goes Global
   
Please support NickerNews.net

Camelot Minis New Lives, Part III

Published: 4/9/2012
View comments
By Sonia Theobalds

Read Part I
Read Part II

While Hope went on her merry way, Faith, turned to a life of low-level pony crime. 

Ponies and minis are known for their intelligence and abilities to escape from impenetrable fencing.  Faith found a spot where she could zip under the electric fence and zoom up to the barn to visit with me while I was doing chores. 
Faith has become extremely friendly and loves being with me.  In  a total of ten days, Faith appeared three times at the barn.  She has one white eyebrow that gives her a wistful appearance and every time she turned up in the aisle she had this funny look that read:

"Ahhhh, I was just in the neighborhood and thought I'd stop by.  How's it going?  I'd be happy to clean up this loose hay for you."

Very sweet. But not a great habit to get into. 
One evening I found the compost bucket on the deck had been dumped out and vegetable clippings were strewn all over the deck.  Grabbing a flashlight, I saw...pony hoofprints.

Then I spied Faith on the lawn, her one white eyebrow cocked, rushing back up to the deck with a look that said: "I didn't do it, but I saw the guy that did it." 

The Compost Queen willingly trotted behind me to the barn, where she promptly plopped down in her newly bedded stall, luxuriously lounged out as if at a pony spa and made "shavings angels" in her fluffy bed. 

I guess she just needed to know she was truly safe.  She most certainly is.
 
If anyone is interested in volunteering to work with The Horse Tales Literacy Project and would like to introduce the program to a local elementary school anywhere in North America, please contact the organization on-line (horsetalesliteracy.org). 

The cost (for both hardcover books and both sessions) is $10.00 per child.  There is also a 5th grade program, with the children reading The Black Stallion and receiving a class DVD of the movie to view.
 
My hope is that if children learn at a young age that horses have feelings, they will grow up and not allow people to discard their animals to go to an uncertain fate. 

Thanks to Tet and the Porters, the minis Gracie, Hope, and Faith have a second lease on life and are now joyfully enriching the lives of others.
 
I would like to express my sincere thanks to Principal Carol Hathorne and to Jennifer Farnsworth, 1st grade teacher, Hope Elementary School. 
Thank you Tet, Megan, Scott, Holly and Leah and my long-suffering horse husband Doug for all your support.    
 

View Reader Comments:

add your comment
4/9/2012 Daryl Conner
I loved this series of stories! Thank you for sharing them and for rescuing sweet souls.

If you liked this article, you may also enjoy:

  • Minis Rescued from Camelot, Part II
  • Life is Short. Enjoy the Ride!
  •    
    "Nothing on four legs is quicker than a horse heading back to the barn" - Pamela C. Biddle/Joel E. Fishman