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Spring arrives. We persevere...

Published: 3/23/2009
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palomaCall it what you like!

By Maddy B. Gray

Yes, indeedy. Spring has arrived.
Pothole Season. Mud Season. Shedding Season. Pick your favorite or invent your own.
Read on for some of my seasonal anecdotes and send along yours!
1. You have to time your trips to the manure pile so they correspond with frozen ground. Getting the wheelbarrow down the path – or should I say – through the soup is like driving through a foot of snow with a lightweight, frontwheel drive car. In other words, it’s a no go.
horse sleep2. Some horses bask in the relative warmth. My 30-year old paint lies down outside her stall for the first time in months. It’s like she’s recharging after the drain of winter.
3. Winter blankets get aired out, packed up and stored ‘til next season. I bring my saddles out of the house and into the tack room.
4. I've put away from coveralls and heated water buckets for the season. But that doesn't me, I was right. Premature is more like it! I have been kicking my buckets free of ice and walking around congealed, cursing the too slow thaw.
And other observations:
1. Heavy Load Limit signs are as ubiquitous as all those Yard Sale signs we’ll see this summer. You need a seasick pill for all the bumps, heaves, and potholes around here. Goodness help all those travelers (like me) with weak bladders!
2. Animals are moving.
I saw three eagles fly over the house today. Three! They must have been migrating because normally eagles don’t make a habit of frequenting my swampy woods. If they do, they are almost always alone.
I can count on two hands to number of times I’ve spotted a mink. This morning was one of them. It was hustling across a tiny, still-frozen pond.
On a more somber note, the increase in animal activity seems to correspond closely with the uptick in roadkills. Crows and other carrion eaters are having a heyday.

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